Skip to main content

Full text of "Stout Alumnus, Spring 1980"

See other formats


c-3 r-7 r-p 





^-i ■iiiiiiir"^ (mm— «J 



m 




C~h 






vw; 




UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN -STOUT - MENOMONIE, WISCONSIN 54751 



SPRING 



1980 




"THINK METRIC "''m convinced" 



'£>, 




°"'' /K 



'^ 



SCHOOL OF HOME ECONOMICS GOES METRIC 



Home Economics "Goes Metric' 




metric manuals and measures 



Recipes call for milliliters instead of cups . . , tem- 
peratures are measured in Celsius, not Fahrenheit . . . 
measurements for clothing are taken in centimeters 
instead of inches . . . the School of Home Economics 
at Stout is going metric. 

Significant progress has already been made toward 
a major goal of the school, which calls for metrication 
of its curriculum and laboratory work. (If you pro- 
nounce the word metrification, you will probably be 
quickly corrected. Addition of the syllable fi is in- 
correct.) 

Though the program is largely voluntary and several 
years from completion, it represents what some feel 
may be major national leadership for Stout to intro- 
duce metric measurement into University course work 
where traditional measurement is usually used. 

J. Anthony Samenfink, dean of home economics at 
Stout and a major supporter of the program, said 
metrication offers a number of advantages "from a 
knowledge point of view but also from the practical 
point of view of getting students jobs." Samenfink 
explained that the already salable Stout graduates, 
who also have a working knowledge of metrics, will 
be even more attractive to business and industry in 
years to come. Many fields served by home economics 
are at various stages of conversion to metric. "It's a 
natural for us," Samenfink said. "Many, of the things 
we deal with in home economics have to be measured. 



Our students are being sensitized in this whole area 
(of metric measurement) and we are already leaps 
ahead." 

The United States made a commitment to metrica- 
tion in 1975 with the passage of the Metric Conversion- 
Act. It says that "the policy of the United States 
shall be to coordinate and plan the increasing use of 
the metric system in the United States and to establish 
the United States metric board to coordinate the vol- 
untary conversion to the metric system." Nationally, 
the move to metric has been somewhat slow, hindered 
in part by fear of change. Some of those fears have 
also been expressed by Stout students and faculty, 
but such apprehensions are quickly melting away. In 
fact, based on reaction from classes, most students 
now have become proponents of metric. 

Its supporters point out that the system allows pre- 
cise and efficient measurement, a practical decimal- 
based system of well-defined units, ease to learn, and 
better world-wide communication of measurements. 

Two staff members who have provided leadership 
in Home Ec's move to metric are Dorothy Jensen, 
department of apparel, textiles and design; and Gladys 
Earl, department of food and nutrition. Jensen and 
Earl have both found metric to be a useful tool for 
the disciplines they teach. 

"I think we've made tremendous progress in the 
School of Home Economics," Jensen said. "Students 



are much better off having been exposed to it 
(metric)." Jensen has been using metric for several 
years in her tailoring class and she is glad that she 
decided to do it. "First of all, it is much more accurate 
and secondly, it makes the working with figures in 
measurements much easier because there are no frac- 
tions," she said. "Actually, students are amazed at 
how much easier it is to take measurements and how 
much easier it is to work with alterations and do 
measuring with metric. It's much easier to figure out 
math calculations with it." 

Jensen urges her students to "think metric," meaning 
that instead of worrying about converting metric to 
traditional measurements, students should simply 
learn to visualize things in a world where metric 
measurement is used. "It finally just becomes so 
familiar that it's not a big issue any more," she said. 
"I think people are making it much more difficult 
than they need to." 

The ability to work with metric is already becoming 
a characteristic that distinguishes 
Stout students. Jensen likes to tell 
of a class where she left it up to 
the students as to whether or not 
they would work with metric mea- 
surements. Only two out of the 
20 students chose not to use metric 
and neither of them had attended 
tlie University in recent years. One 
was a transfer student from another 
university and the other was a 
graduate student who had not at- 
tended Stout in about 10 years. 
"They indicated to me that they 
had never had any exposure to 
metric at all," Jensen said. But 
after only one week of class, the 
graduate student concluded that 
"metric was really the way to go," 
she said. 

She feels that metric is becoming 
"easier to teach" because "more 
and more of the companies are 
converting to metric." For example, 
tape measures, hem gauges and rulers are now avail- 
able in dual measurements or even exclusively metric 
measurements. Some pattern companies, thread 
makers and trim manufactures are packaging their 
products with metric measurements. "Zippers are 
often given in metric measurement on the package as 
well as the standard," Jensen said. 

Earl uses metrics in the foods classes that she teaches 
and student response there has also been enthusiastic. 
"The students have really accepted it," she said. "They 
realize it's coming and they want to be prepared." 
She calls students "our greatest proponents" toward 
conversion to metric. "In the past, when we simply 
lectured about the metric system, students were either 
apprehensive or uninterested," she said. "Today they 
are completely sold on the metric system and request 
that classes be taught metrically." Earl called metrics 
a "very simple, practical system" that offers distinct 
advantages in food preparation. "Metric recipes are 
easier to prepare than our customary ones since all 
measurements are consistent within each measure- 
ment category," she said. "The metric system is based 




on multiples or divisions of 10 and increasing or de- 
ceasing the quantity of a recipe is also very simple." 

She said some people fear that metrication will pre- 
vent the use of old recipes, but that need not be the 
case. "What I am trying to get across is that you 
must think metric," she said, explaining that it is 
easy to understand the metric counterpart to tradi- 
tional measurement. "It comes very easily and very 
naturally with use," she said. Earl has found little 
difficulty in obtaining metric measuring devices for 
her class. Some have been available for years and 
others have recently become readily available. 

A major contribution to U.S. metrication was com- 
pleted recently, with the publication of a 221-page 
food principles laboratory manual called "Make it 
Metric." It has recipes and measurements entirely 
in metric. Developed by Earl, along with home 
economics staff members Anita Pershern and Anita 
Wilson, the manual is the first of its kind to be pro- 
duced in this country. The manual, which is appro- 
priate for basic food preparation and food science 
classes, was tested for a full year 
at Stout before publication. "The 
purposes of the food laboratory 
manual are to demonstrate to star 
dents the scientific principles of 
food chemistry; to provide experi- 
ence in using the metric system; 
to acquaint students with standard 
food products; and to develop in 
those students the ability to judge 
food quality and expend the crea- 
tivity of students in the realm of 
food preparation by acquainting 
them with new foods, recipes and 
preparation techniques," Earl said. 
"I can't think of a better way for 
educators to encourage metrication 
in the United States than to prepare 
a well-trained force of college 
graduates familiar with metric 
usage in their profession," added 
Wilson, who is administrator of the 
department of food and nutrition. 
The manual is available from 
Burgess Publishing Co., Minneapolis, at a cost of 
$9.95. 

Other departments in the School of Home Eco- 
nomics are also switching to metric. "We're making 
changes in equipment and we're ordering metric 
research equipment," said Tom Phillips of the depart- 
ment of habitational resources. "We are implementing 
it in a number of courses." 

Priscilla Resting said that metric is being used in 
a math course for early childhood education that 
prepares students to teach young children. "We are 
preparing for teaching in the future; we know it is 
coming," she said. "It's an exposure kind of thing. 
Students in the class said that they haven't had it 
but they want to know more about it so they become 
more comfortable with it." 

Opinions vary on how long it will be before the 
United States changes entirely to the metric system. 
Some say it will take years, while others predict it 
is just around the corner. Begardless of when it 
happens, Stout graduates will be ready for it. 



Changing of the Guard at Two Major Posts 



Search and screen committees have been appointed to 
seek candidates for two top administrative positions 
at Stout. Both posts will become vacant July 1. 

Replacements are being sought for Herbert 
Anderson, dean of the School of Industry and Tech- 
nology, who will retire after 28 years of service to 
the university; and Theodore Baker, dean of the 
School of Liberal Studies, who has resigned to return 
to his home in the Eastern United States. 

Anderson has been dean of industry and technology 
at Stout for 14 years. He also served as chairman of 
the departments of woodworking and drafting. He 
is one of the founders of the Stout University Founda- 
tion and the originator of the University's annual 
industrial education conference. Anderson plans to 
remain in Menomonie, where he will do consulting 
work in the fields of industrial education and in- 
dustrial technology. 

Baker has been dean of liberal studies at Stout 
since 1977. Prior to that, he was dean of the School 
of Humanities and Sciences at Ithaca College, Ithaca, 
NY. He also served in the department of engineering 
and applied sciences at Yale University and was an 



'l!U,i 




Anderson 



Baker 



assistant dean of Yale College. Baker said that his 
reason for resigning was "personal" and that he and 
his family plan to return East. . "My job has been 
marvelous," Baker said, "I have enjoyed its profes- 
sional challenges and the opportunities to work with 
so many fine people." 



Jobs Still Plentiful for Stout Grads 



More than 96 percent of recent graduates at 
Stout were placed, according to the annual 
report of the university's Career Planning and 
Placement Service. The report covers graduating 
classes of December, 1978; and May and August, 
1979. 

The report said the "most significant single 
change in the past several years" 'has been the 
number of companies recruiting on campus. 
For example, in the 1975-76 period there were 
133 companies and schools recruiting on campus, 
compared with 209 in 1978-79. The report also 
cited a 60 percent increase in the number of 
interview schedules, comparing those two 
periods. 

Robert Dahlke, director of Career Planning 
and Placement Services, said the university's 
successful placement record can be attributed to 
the institution's programs. "Stout continues in 
its mission to provide career-oriented programs; 
programs that are vocationally oriented but 
coupled with a strong liberal arts base," he said. 
"That combination produces a graduate that is 
highly desirable by business and industry as 
well as education." 

Other highlights of the report concluded: 
— There is a continued critical need for industrial 
education teachers. "While the number of gradu- 
ates remains around 140, some estimates indicate 
double that number would have been placed in 
teaching positions (if they had been available)," 
the report said. "Industrial education oppor- 
tunities existed in almost every state. To further 
complicate this shortage, more graduates than 
before are accepting initial careers in industry 
and it is anticipated that this trend will con- 



tinue." The report goes on to say that although 
the shortage of these teachers is critical now, 
"the future looks more acute in 1980-81" when 
the number of graduates in this area is expected 
to decline. 

— Teacher education majors at Stout continue 
,to enjoy career flexibility. "This is true in home 

economics, and marketing and distributive edu- 
cation, where regardless of a tighter teacher job 
market graduates seek and find employment in 
business and industry, (96 percent and 100 per- 
cent placement respectively)," the report said. 
"Many new specialties are developing in early 
childhood and preschool areas. This expansion 
of programs is providing varied opportunities 
for the early childhood education teacher." 

— Students prepared for careers in business and 
industry experienced what the report called "an 
excellent job market." Industrial technology and 
applied mathematics graduates had average 
annual starting salaries of $16,000. "Other majors 
in merchandising and hotel and restaurant man- 
agement were exposed to excellent opportuni- 
ties," the report said. "Close to 100 percent place- 
ment was experienced in these disciplines." 

— Jobs in the so called human service areas in- 
creased in numbers. "This is reflected in the 
success of graduates in vocational rehabilitation 
and in child development and family life," the 
report said. 

Figures listed included only students who were 
graduated from Stout with bachelor's degrees. 
Graduate and post-graduate students were listed 
in a separate report, which showed a 98 percent 
placement record. 



Study Shows 
Electric Oven 
Wastes Cash 

An electric oven can be up to 
fifteen times more costly to run 
than a portable electric pressure 
cooker, when preparing a meal 
for a family of four, according 
to a series of studies at the 
university. 

Conducted in laboratory facili- 
ties at Stout's home economics 
building, the tests are among 
the first to be done in the United 
States for nearly 40 years. "Much 
of the time and energy research 
(on electric cooking appliances) 
was completed in the 1930's and 
the 1940s and the results may 
not be applicable to major cook- 
ing appliances today," said Anita 
Wilson, project director. She 
explained that until recently, 
energy was so inexpensive that 
this kind of research was not 
needed. "There is a minimum 
of reseach in the area of energy 
utilization of cooking appliances 
because energy has been so in- 
expensive compared with food 
and other items that there really 
has not been a need for this type 
of research," she said. 

Appliances involved in this 
test included electric ovens, elec- 
tric range surface units (burn- 
ers), microwave ovens, portable 
electric pressure cookers and 
regular pressure cookers. Foods 
prepared included custard, beef 
pot roast, green beans, baked 
beans and an entire meal con- 
sisting of chicken, potatoes and 
Brussels sprouts. 

Each appliance was metered 
to measure its electrical con- 
sumption. "Total kilowatts of 
electrical energy used were mul- 
tiplied by the average price 
charged in the upper midwest 
United States in the spring of 
1979," Wilson said. "Thus, cost 
is in direct correlation with 
energy consumed." 

In addition to energy con- 
sumption, appliances were meas- 




ured for the amount of cooking 
time required and for the quality 
of the finished food product. A 
"taste panel" was used to evalu- 
ate results. Appliances scored 
near even for taste. 

Although the studies pro- 
duced complex sets of figures 
and statistics, reports in most 
cases conclude that tire portable 
electric pressure cooker scored 
best in terms of time and low 
electrical consumption. For ex- 
ample, in one study the electric 
oven consumed 7.6 cents to cook 
a meal, while the electric pres- 
sure cooker required only .4 
cents. "The big results (of the 
studies) is that the oven is not 
very energy efficient," Wilson 
said. "For the average family of 
two to four people, it is generally 
inefficient to use the oven unless 
several foods are cooked at once. 
There are other appliances that 
can do the job more efficiently. 
Overall we would say that the 
portable pressure cooker was the 
most cost and energy efficient." 
She added, though, that for big 
families or when cooking large 
quantities of food, the electric 
oven may still be necessary. For 
most families it is not. 



"The old appliance that has 
been with us for a long time, the 
pressure cooker, does a speedy 
job and in most cases comes up 
with better quality," Wilson said. 

Although the portable electric 
pressure cooker often ranked 
first, conventional pressure cook- 
ers used on range tops and 
microwave ovens also received 
high scores for electrical con- 
servation. "We could save time 
and get comparable products 
with pressure cookers that cost 
$35 or $40, compared with a 
microwave that would cost 10 
times that," she said. 

Wilson is administrator of the 
department of food and nutri- 
tion at Stout. Other participants 
in the project were Jeanette 
Alger, an instructor in the de- 
partment of habitational re- 
sources and Mary Jo Lucia, a 
graduate student at the time of 
the test. The project was fi- 
nanced by a grant from the 
Stout University Foundation, Inc. 



Students Study Basic Hand Tool Use 



KW: 



*%ii 




mmm At Stout, where many 
courses deal with com- 
plex technology and 
sophisticated equip- 
ment, there is now an 
opportunity for stu- 
dents to study basic 
hand tools. 

The one credit 
course, titled Basic 
Woodworking, was in- 
itiated at the request of students preparing to be indus- 
trial education teachers, but has proven to be popular 
among other majors as well. 

While faculty members do not equate the course to 
the "back to the basics" movement in subjects such as 
English and mathematics, they do acknowledge that it 
fills a void that developed as modern technology became 
more complex. 

"We had several student teachers who felt they knew 
a lot about the advanced technology, but realized they 
didn't really know much about basic hand tools," 
said James Bjornerud, director of the industrial educa- 
tion major at Stout. "They felt they really needed to be 
able to do these things because they felt their students 
shoujd be able to do them and they found their own 
skills lacking." But Bjornerud pointed out the class is 
not limited to future industrial education teachers. "I 
think it fills a basic everyday need rather than some- 
thing needed by one group like teachers," he said. "Other 
students just want to increase some of those basic skills 
that everybody has use for now and then." 

Frank Pershern, instructor for the course, said he does 
not expect students to immediately become skilled 
craftsmen. "The ultimate development of skill comes 
from practice over a long period of time and we cannot 
realistically think that we are going to accomplish this 
in an eight-week quarter," he said. "Some of these 
students have no experience whatsoever and I don't 
expect that they're going to produce a quality project 
in the time we have available. They're learning and that 
is main thrust here." 

Pershern begins with a basic explanation of specific 
hand tools. Then, each student must come up with a 
small project. Typical items include jewelry boxes, 
shelves and mirror frames. "They're small projects be- 
cause everything must be processed by hand. They are 
a lot of work," Pershern said. "The project is not the 
main emphasis of the course. The idea is to develop 
techniques for using hand tools." 

Pershern sees the learning experience as valuable in 
several ways. "There are any number of occasions where 
power equipment is not going to be available," he said. 
"Also, students who want to pursue woodworking as a 
hobby may not want to invest a substantial amount of 
money in a large array of machine tools." 

He also said that working with one's hands can be a 
source of personal satisfaction. "There is an element of 
pride in producing something strictly with hand tools 
as opposed to working with machine tools," he said. "It 
is possible to produce a better product with more 
sophisticated pieces of equipment, but this does not 
lessen one's pride in having accomplished something with 




learning the basics 

hand tools. It is an area of self-expression." 

Bjornerud feels that die course allows students to feel 
more self-sufficient. "We started to depend on everyone 
else to do things for us," he said. "If something broke 
down in the home, we'd always call in someone else to 
do it. We became very dependent on other persons. 
Recently, I think people have decided they wanted to 
be a little more independent, to develop some skills and 
to feel more self-sufficient." 

Although modern technology is often thought of in 
terms of complicated machinery and equipment, using 
hand tools could be a method of learning to understand 
that technology, according to Bjornerud. "We're begin- 
ning to realize that a lot of these sophisticated tech- 
nologies really have some very simple technologies at their 
base and those very simple tools are still very effective," 
he said. "I think we have gotten now to die point that 
we have jumped over some of those basic things to the 
more sophisticated technology and in the process there 
has been a void diere." Understanding hand tools can 
fill that void, he added. "Whenever you get to know 
something real well, whether it is a piece of metal or 
a piece of wood or a tool that works on one or the other, 
you really start to understand what technology is all 
about," he said. 





u-m 




[•#**".*•--.» 




!*td 








Pershern demonstrating techniques 





0\ 



>- 




■te^ 



f«^^ 



*< .. 




ids on experience 



Class Notes 



1924-1958 

PAUL HUBER BS '24, MS '42 retired 
after being president for eight years of 
the Cochrane County Retired Teachers 
Association. 

CLIFFORD PETERSON Dip. '25, BS 
'29, MA '39 is substitute teaching for the 
Sioux City school system in Iowa. 

ARTHUR COLBURN '30 is retired 
and lives in Baltimore, Md. 

FRANKLIN GOTTSHALL '32 had 

his 15th book, "Masterpiece Furniture 
Making," published by Stackpole Books, 
Harrisburg, Penn. 

JAY '41 and MARIAN GULLICKSON 

LOCKERBY '41 reside in Woodville. He 
is retired from teaching metals in Salem, 
Ore. 

ROBERT MARTIN '41 is retired and 
living in Cape Coral, Fla. 

JOHN '4 2 and MARIAN 

HENDERSON '42 reside in Naperville, 
111. He is retired from American Airlines 
and the U.S. Navy and has accepted a 
position with Aero America. 

ARTHUR MEDTLIE '47, Menomonie 
was honored as outgoing president of 
the Wisconsin Vocational, Technical and 
Adult Education Boards Association. 

WALLACE BS '49, MS '52 and 
NORMA NELSON HAMMERBERG '49 

reside in Highland Park, 111. He is the 
assistant principal at Deerfield High 
School. She is a coordinator for voca- 
tional education for District #113. 

MARVIN FRIEBEL '50 is teaching 
electronics at Redondo Union High 
School in Redondo Beach, Calif. 

JOHN LURQUIN BS '50, MS '52 is 
president of IEA Locali-Evergreen Park 
High School Teachers' Association and 
president, of School Employee's Credit 
Union. 

RUSSELL '50 and HELEN WOLSEY 

TEWS '50 reside in Hales Corner's. He 
teaches woodworking at Hamilton Senior 
High in Milwaukee and she teaches 
clothing at Milwaukee Area Technical 
College, South Campus Center. 

BARBARA HILTS FRITZ '55 is office 
manager and is selling for an ERA 
broker. Resides in Milwaukee. 

CELIA FRITZ LAUSTED '55 is chair- 
man of the Governor's Task Force on 
Marital Property Reform and is a Colfax 
farmer. 

AL OCHS '55 is the area adult edu- 
cation services coordinator at Northeast 
Wisconsin Technical Institute, Green 
Bay. 

JOHN OAKESON '56 was elected a 
member of the executive board of the 
Northwestern Wisconsin Education As- 
sociation. 

VALEN VAITKUS '58 teaches wood- 
working at Whitnall Middle School. He 
resides in Mukwonago. 

1961 -1970 

PATRICIA REISINGER BS '61, MS 
'67 has been elected to a two-year term 
as national president of Stout's Alumni 
Association. 



JOHN PAGELS '63 was named "Out- 
standing International Craftsman of the 
Year." 

THOMAS DINGES BS '64, MS '65 
has recently been promoted to vice- 
president and general manager of the 
Toledo Division of Copco Papers, Inc., 
a subsidiary of Alco Standard Corp. 

WILLIAM KUEHN '64 teaches 
project cabinetry for Moraine Park 
Technical Institute, Fond du Lac. 

RICHARD BELKE BS '65, MS '66 is 
associated with Lutheran Brotherhood's 
Fred Polzin Agency, headquartered in 
Fond du Lac. 

BONNIE JENNINGS WILLIAMS '65 

is associate professor for UW-Extension. 

CAROLYN KREUGER '66 is the 

Bayfield home economics agent. 

JUDITH MILLER WROLSTAD '67 

has been hired by the Skaalen Founda- 
tion as the director of Church and 
Community Relations, Stoughton. 

LOREN BUSSEWITZ '68 is teaching 
industrial education at Greendale 
Public School. 

CARLA HAYES OLSON '68 is an 

assistant manager at the Ramanda Inn, 
Rockford, 111. 

JOSEPH YUZA Jr., '68 is an indus- 
trial engineer III at JI Case, Terre 
Haute, Ind. 

CHERYL ESLINGER CHACKA '69 

teaches kindergarten in the North St. 
Paul -Maple wood -Oakdale school dis- 
trict. 

WILLIAM HANLEY BS '69, BS '70 
is parts department manager for 
Hanley's of Sun Prairie. 

RICHARD REINDL "69 owns and 
operates Reindl Printing Co., Merrill. 

TONY MS '70 and TRUDY 
NODGAARD LANGTON '72 reside in 
Menomonie, He is president of the 
Wisconsin Rehabilitation Association. 
She is employed by Reed's Fabrics. 

DANIEL STEWART BS '70, MS '71 
was elected president of the Indiana 
Association of Rehabilitation facilities. 

KAY SONNTAG WILSON '70 and her 

husband Paul own Pioneer Acres 
Resort, Ephraim. 

BOB '70 and KAREN PETERSON 
ZWISSLER '70 reside in Hartland. He 
owns Avenue Lawn and Leisure, Inc. 
in Menomonee Falls. She is an in- 
structor/adviser for a fashion merchan- 
dising program at Milwaukee Area 
Technical College. 



The Stout Alumnus 

The Stout Alumnus Is an official publication 
of University of Wisconsin-Stout. It Is 
published quarterly. 

John K. Enger Editor 

Roberta Obermueller . . . . Ass't. to the Editor 

Carol Richard Class Notes 

The Stout Alumnus Is distributed to 
graduates, friends and faculty of the Univer- 
sity, it is entered at the post office 
Menomonie, Wis., as third class matter. 
Jack Wile Alumni Director 



1971 -1973 

STEVE CHRISTOPHERSEN '71 is 
the resident engineer for Snap-on Tools 
in Michigan. 

ARLIN CORTELLYOU '71 is the 

welding instructor at Lewis and Clark 
Community College, Godfrey, 111. 

HOWARD DRAHEIM '71 teaches 
industrial arts at Pardeeville High 
School. 

PETER KRIZ BS '71, MS '73 is an 
engineering change coordinator for Ford 
Motor Co., Detroit, Mich, 

KATHLEEN MEYER '71 is teaching 
home economics at Menomonee Falls 
North High School. 

STEVEN WEBB BS '71, MS '79 
teaches industrial arts at Denmark. 

SUSAN NIEBAUER ZIEBELL BS 

'71, MS '72 is employed by Ruan Trans- 
port Corp., Des Moines, Iowa as a 
dispatcher and location manager in 
Milwaukee. 

WALTER GOES '72 is director of the 
picture and art department at Goes 
Lithographing Co., Chicago, 111. 

THOMAS GUNDRUM '72 is the 

assistant foundry superintendent at 
Brillion Iron Works, Brillion. 

JAMES HESKETH '72 has recently 
purchased Blaske Printing in Rice Lake. 

DAVID HOPPE BS '72, MS '75 is a 
counselor at Madison East High School. 

HENRY KURTH '72 is the principal 
at the Stanley-Boyd High School. 

SPENCER MOSLEY '72 is president 
of the Wisconsin Rehabilitation As- 
sociation. 

WILLIAM SCHALLER '72 is an 

industrial teacher for the Wacker Corp., 
Muskego. 

ROBERT BORUFKA '73 is the busi- 
ness education instructor at Ithaca. 

JEFF BRICK '73 is the post-secondary 
T and I supervisor for Minnesota's 
Department of Education, vocational 
division. He resides in Savage, Minn. 

MARGARET OLSON 
CHRISTIANSON '73 is the public health 
nutritionist for the Milwaukee health 
department. 

CHERI JO DESMARAIS '73 is teach- 
ing secondary MR at Sevastopal School, 
Sturgeon Bay. 

JANICE SERUM GRANER '73 is 

coordinator of clinical dietetics at the 
Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. 

BARNEY KLECKER BS '73, MS '76 
won the City of Lakes Marathon in 
Minneapolis. 

GARY KORTE '73 is innkeeper of 
Holiday Inn-Cleveland-Wickliffe, Ohio. 

JAMES McDERMOTT BA '73, ME 
'75 is the school psychologist at 
Pardeeville Junior High School. 

SANDRA PLODZIEN RODGERS '73 

teaches art and art science at Sacred 
Heart School for girls in Hamilton, New 
Zealand. 



1974-1975 

DONNA ANDERSEN '74 is the 

assistant manager at Lee Ward's Arts 
and Crafts Store in Taylor, Mich. 

JERRY BALISTRERI BS '74, MS '77 
is the new principal at Wauzeka. 

RUSSELL BIRKHOLZ '74 is working 
at Milwaukee Trade and Technical High 
School. 

PATRICIA FELDNER '74 is the 

Wales village president. 

DAVID '74 and SUSAN MAYER 
LUNDIN '73 reside in Stoughton. He 
is an industrial arts teacher at Edgerton 
High School. She is food service ad- 
ministrator at UW-Madison. 

JUDITH MORGAN '74 was promoted 
to management in hospital management 
for Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer 
Center. She resides in New York, N.Y. 

MARILYN GREINER NEST '74 
teaches home economics at Tigerton 
High School, Marion. 

JOY PETERSON MS '74 is a drill 
sergeant in the U.S. Army at Ft. 
Jackson, S.C. 

FRED POSTHUMA '74 teaches at 
Westfield High School where his classes 
have produced a solar collector system 
and a wind generator. 

ARTHUR CARTER '75 owns a retail 
floor covering store in Eagle River. 

MARK GABLE '75 is teaching in- 
dustrial arts at Minneapolis North High 
School. 

TODD HAMMOND '75 is a patrol- 
man for the Oelwein, Iowa police de- 
partment. 

CYNTHIA HUBER '75 is coordinator 
of the alternate learning program, 
McFarland High School. 

LYNN HONECK '75 is a vocational 
program developer at the Children's 
Hospital in Boston. 

KATHY LEANNAH '75 is teaching 
home economics at Bayside Middle 
School. 

GENE O'CONNELL '75 is manager 
of Midway Motor Lodge, Milwaukee. 

LAURA OLDENBERG '75 is the 

UW-Extension home economist in 
Marinette County. 

JAMES RADATZ '75 is pastor of 
Makoti Lutheran Parish in North 
Dakota. 

DAVID STOUT '75 is working at 
Tonolli Corp., Nesquehoning, Pa., as an 
assistant field engineer. 

SARA STRATTON '75 is a claims 
adjuster for Safeco Insurance Co., 
Portland, Ore. 

JOHN '75 and VICKIE JOHNSON 

WATERS '75 reside in Greenwood. He 
is teaching auto mechanics and welding 
at Greenwood High School. She is a 
school psychologist for CESA #6, 
Chippewa Falls, working in the Green- 
wood and Loyal school districts. 

JAMES ZELLMER '75 is a middle 
school art teacher for the Southern Door 
School District. He resides in Sturgeon 
Bay. 



Distinguished Alumni 




Bieniasz 



Fortin 



Geraldine Erickson Bieniasz (BS 
'53, MS 73) and John E. Fortin 
(BS '36) were presented the Uni- 
versity's Alumni Distinguished 
Service Award during Winter 
Commencement ceremonies. 

Fortin, who resides in Murray, 
Ky., is a professor of vocational 
technical education, Department 
of Industrial Education, Murray 
State University. 

Bieniasz, who resides in 
Amery, is teaching home eco- 
nomics at Clear Lake. 



1976-1977 

DANIEL '76 and KATHLEEN 

ASHLEY '77 reside in Aberdeen, S.D. 
He is a unit manager with Control Data 
Corp., magnetic peripherals. 

NANCY GALLMAN '76 is teaching 
home economics at Menomonee Falls 
North High School. 

GARY '76 and CATHY DALZELL 

GRAF '78 reside in Norfolk, Va. He is 
a machinist in the Navy and she teaches 
at Breezy Point kindergarten on the 
naval base. 

KEVIN JAMES '76 is a customer 
service representative at Rockwell 
Avionics and Missiles Group. Resides in 
Cedar Falls, Iowa. 

GLEN '76 and NANCY BOJAR 

KROFT '74 reside in Plymouth, Minn. 
He is a senior loss control representative 
for CNA Insurance Co. She is the food 
service director for Edina public schools. 

WILLIAM '76 and MARILYN DYE 
LEMSKY '76 reside in Racine. He is 
an industrial engineer for the Young 
Radiator Co. She is a customer service 
representative for Medical Engineering 
Corp. 

GAIL '76 and KENNETH MYERS 

BS '76, MS '77 reside in Crookston, 
Minn. He is an instructor at the Uni- 
versity of Minnesota in Crookston. She 
is an advertising consultant and also 
teaches part time at the University. 

CYNTHIA COMER STENAVICH '76 

is working as a clinical dietitian at St. 
Joseph's Hospital, Marshfield. 

BETTY VRIES ACKER '76 is. director 
of activities at the Dunn County Health 
Care Center in Menomonie. 



MARY ZELENKA '76 was Miss 
Holiday Folk Fair 1979, Milwaukee. 

RUSSEL '77 and DIANE PRASCHAK 
ARNESON '77 reside in Wausau. He is 
employed in research and development 
at Greenheck Fan and Ventilating Corp., 
Schofield. She is teaching special edu- 
cation (EMR) and alternative education 
at the Wausau high schools. 

SHARON HACZYNSKI '77 is the 

CETA coordinator at Southwest Wis- 
consin Vocational Technical Institute, 
Fennimore. 

MARGARET KLECKER '77 teaches 
the educational mentally retarded at 
Whitefish Bay High School. 

MARK '77 and JANET BATTERMANN 

KLOTZ '77 reside in Grafton. They 
manage Circle "B" Recreation in 
Cedarburg. 

JEFFREY KOCH '77 is employed 
with Butterwick Enterprise, Vail, Colo., 
as a real estate representative and 
marketing manager of Sun Energy 
Systems, Denver, Colo. 

BOB LICHTY '77 is an admissions 
counselor at Mount Senario College, 
Ladysmith. 

WILLIAM MARQUARDT '77 is sales 
manager for Gaper's Catering of 
Cincinnati. 

JAN McCANN '77 is managing the 
JH Collectible Store, a Junior House 
manufacturer out of Milwaukee. 

RITA MURKOWSKI '77 is an asso- 
ciate packaging designer at Continental 
Forest Industries, Columbia, S.C. 

DAVID SCOTT '77 is an instructor 
of land surveying technology at 
Madison Area Technical College. 

LOIS THUEMMLER '77 is the dis- 
tributive education teacher at McFarland 
High School. 

BARBARA TILDERQUIST '77 is em- 
ployed for Lutheran Social Service in . 
Minneapolis as a counselor for emotion- 
ally disturbed girls at Friendship House 
I. 

ANNE VAREKA '77 is an assistant 
service and production manager at 
UW-River Falls. 

DEBORAH VOGT WINKLER '77 is 

working at Ripon Area Service Center 
as a special education teacher. 

1978-1979 

JUDITH BRAUNWORTH '78 is the 

food and beverage director at the 
Holiday Inn in Grand Rapids, Minn. 

WILLIAM GIEDE '78 is the district 
scout executive for Sawoset Council 
Inc. in Wausau. 

KAREN KETTLEWELL 
HARRINGTON MS '78 is employed as 
extension food and nutrition specialist 
for University of Wyoming in Laramie. 

HEIDI HOFMANN HOOVER '78 is 

a dietitian at the VA Hospital in 
Minneapolis. 

DOUGLAS '78 and SUE HARVEY 

JOHNSON '78 reside in Jackson, Tenn. 
He is employed by Alton Box Board Co. 
as a package design engineer. She is a 
training director for Kisber's Depart- 
ment Store. 



10 



R. PHIL JORGENSEN MS '78 is 

the development manager for New 
Dimensions, Bay City, Mich. 

ANDY KANGAS '78 is the department 
supervisor for Print Service, American 
Can's River Canal Plant, Menasha. 

MARLYS KEECH '78 _ is a meat 
product sales representative for the 
George A. Hormel Co., Austin, Minn. 

JOANNE KENNEY '78 is manager of 
Smoke Haus Restaurant in Robbinsdale, 
Minn. 

MARY BETH MILLER '78 is a 

nutritionist for the W.I.C. program for 
six counties in Southwestern Wisconsin. 

RANDY MILLER '78 is a manufac- 
turing engineer at a G.E.-Apparatus 
Service Shop in Salt Lake City. 

JAN NICHOLS '78 is communications 
manager for the U.S. Travel Data Center 
in Washington, D. C. 

S. L. PANETTI '78 is an account 
manager with the Quaker Oats Co. out 
of Detroit. Resides in Wyoming, Mich. 

GERRY PAUL '78 is the packaging 
engineer for Chilton Aluminum in 
Manitowoc. 

DENNIS POHLE '78 is an assistant 
plant manager for Diversey Chemicals, 
Chippewa Falls. 

KAREN GAIER '79 has been appoint- 
ed assistant manager of the County Seat 
at Maplewood Mall St. Paul, Minn. 

JEFFREY KRAHN '79 is teaching 
industrial arts at Stanley-Boyd. 

MARY SOMMERS '79 is the assistant 
manager for D'finity, a specialty store 
owned by the Dayton-Hudson Corp., 
Wayzata, Minn. 



Marriages 



1969-1977 

Beverly Alves to RONALD DAY '69, 
Oct. 13, Appleton. 

DELORES BITNER '72 to Dale 
Morud, June 23, Grand Rapids, Minn. 

Zona Wick to ANTHONY 
RODEGHIERO '73, Oct. 20, Hurley. 

GEORGIA HOHMANN '74 to Terry 
Newman, Sept. 15, Hayward. 

Barbara Kollmann to MICHAEL 
INGELS '74, Sept. 22, Sheboygan Falls. 

Jo Anne Sevedge to WILLIAM KIRBY 

'74, Sept. 15, Wauwatosa. 

CHRISTINE WHITE '74 to Kevin 
Shimpach, Sept. 8. Couple resides in 
Tigard, Ore. 

MARY WILSON '75 to Ralph Dach, 
Oct. 13, Janesville. 

JILL ECKL '76 to Michael Burchett, 
Oct. 27, Milwaukee. 

Cindy Kay to TIMOTHY EGGER '76, 
June 22, Menomonee Falls. 

PATRICIA RUPPRECHT '76 to Brian 
Tautges, June 16, Milwaukee. 

Nancy Jo Hintz to MARK GOODMAN 

'77, Aug. 18, Oshkosh. 



DENISE OLSON '77 to DAVID 

POLLOCK '76, Oct. 20. Couple resides 
in Palantine, 111. 

MARY PAUL '77 to Greg Schroeder, 
Sept. 8, La Crosse. 

DIANE SCHAEFER '77 to Jerome 
Hollenstein, Sept. 1, Wauwatosa. 

Jodi Reiss to PAUL ZELINGER '77, 
June 16, Waukesha. 

1978-1979 

SUE GORNOWICH '78 to Kimon 
Teed, June 8, Wautoma. 

JILL GUTENKUNST '78 to MARK 
ECKER '77, Sept. 2, Madison. 

JAYE PETERSEN '78 to JOSEPH 

CIONTA Jr. '76, July 28, Elgin, 111. 

LORNA ROCK '78 to David Feemster, 
Oct. 27, Stratford. 

LORI UMNUS '78 to George Gosz, 
Oct. 6, Manitowoc. 

DAWN WEBER '78 to Douglas 
Parsons, Nov. 3, Madison. 

MONICA WESLEY '78 to NEIL 

HOUTLER '76, July 28. Couple resides 
in Milwaukee. 

Katherine Aune to TIMOTHY COMER 

'79, Aug. 18, Rice Lake. 

DIXIE BOHNERT '79 to David 
Erickson, Oct. 20, Tomahawk. 

MARY KENNEY '79 to Alan 
Northouse, Aug. 25, Fennimore. 
Colette Obiala to GEORGE LIECHTY 

'79, Sept. 8, Elkhorn. 

ROBERTA OLSON '79 to David 
Lundberg, Sept. 1, Minneapolis. 

CATHERINE RINTA '79 to Herbert 
Evans, Aug. 31, Virginia, Minn. 

KAREN BOBBINS '79 to John 
Archambeault, Sept, 8, Apple Canyon 
Lake. 



Births 



A son, Robert Thomas, Aug. 20, to 
CHARLES '66 and KAREN ANDERSON 
BERNATH '67, Mechanicsburg, Penn. 

A daughter, Ann Marie, May 3, to 
James and KATHRYN BELONGIA 
RALSTON '68, Fond du Lac. 

A daughter, May, 13, to Mr. and Mrs. 
RICHARD L. ERICKSON '69, Appleton. 

A daughter, Tori Kristin, Aug. 21, to 
WILLIAM BS '70, MS '72, '75 and 
SHIRLEY JOHNSON STEWART BS 

'70, MS '73, '74, Menomonie. 

A daughter, Emily Jean, Sept. 21 to 
David and JULIE LEWIS HERMAN 

'71. 

A son, Mark Joseph, Aug. 9, to Ron 
and SHARON JOHNSON HOLDEN '71, 
Plymouth, Minn. 

A son, Matthew, March 15, to Mr. and 
Mrs. WILLIAM RABOIN '71, Fond du 
Lac, 



A son, Joshua Paul, Aug. 24, to 
DENNIS '71 and SUSAN HELSTAD 
SPAETE '70, Bessemer, Mich. 

A second child, Courtney Marie, June 
15, to RONALD '72 and JEAN COURT 
BLOXHAM '73, Mason City, Iowa. 

A daughter, Amy Lee, June 11, to 
RAYMOND '72 and LEE ANN 
STEFFEN ONDIACEK '72, Boulder 
Junction. 

A daughter, Danielle Elizabeth, Sept. 
22, to Mr. and Mrs. STEPHEN HUBERT 
'73, Albany. 

A son, Robert William, July 21, to 
JERRY '73 and KATHY ZUTZ WISKOW 

'73, Milwaukee. 

A son, Benjamin Thomas, June 29, to 
MILES '73 and BARBARA GAEGER 
ZASTROW '74, Forestville. 

A daughter, Suzann Alissabeth, Feb. 
18, to JOHN MS '74 and CYNTHIA 
WOODWICK HANSON '73, Toledo, 
Ohio. 

A daughter, Valerie Lynn, April 19, 
to RUSSELL '74 and ROSEMARIE 
SERRE KOTH '74, Milwaukee. 

A son, Michael David, Nov. 29, to 
DAVID '74 and SUSAN MAYER 
LUNDIN '73, Stoughton. 

A first child, Eric Steven, Aug, 28 
to STEVEN '74 and JANE SARLES 
LUNSETH '74, Grand Forks, N.D. 

A daughter, Jessica Erin, Aug. 12 
to Marlene and THOMAS BURKE '75, 
Hales Corners. 

A daughter, Andrea Jo, Aug. 18, to 
Ralph and JORI STEIN BORCHERT 

'76, Menomonie. 

A daughter, Jennifer Kay, Sept. 11, 
to WILLIAM '76 and KATHRYN 
PETERSON DAVIS '76, Ripon. 

A first child, Jaime Elizabeth, Sept. 
20, to DONALD '76 and Donna Van De 
Velde Tauchen, Villa Park, 111. ' 



Deaths 



HATTY DAHLBERG '05, 97, Chip- 
pewa Falls. She was the oldest living 
alumnus from Stout and received the 
Chancellor's Award in 1979. 

LEONA HUSSA BRUHA '17, 83, 
Oct. 9, La Crosse. 

RUTH THORSEN LANOUE '20, 
June 14, Lauderdale By The Sea, Fla. 

WILLIAM J. DUNLOP '25, Nov. 9, 
Spokane, Wash. 

SIDNEY HEATH '30, 72, Nov. 29, 
Wells, Minn. 

HOMER W. SETTLES '50, Dec. 22, 
1978, Bowling Green, Ohio. 

ARNOLD LIEN '69, 58, Oct. 1, 
Whitewater. 

ROCHELLE WOLFE '77, 24, Nov. 9, 
Green Bay. 



Campus Notes 



Stout will sponsor three of more 
than 50 academic European tours 
being offered this summer in co- 
operation with seven major institu- 
tions from the upper midwest. 
Stout's tours will be in the areas of 
vocational education and early 
childhood education, 

The 50 tours represent 14 dif- 
ferent subject areas. Participating 
institutions are working with the 
Education Cooperative, a private 
Green Bay firm specializing in 
academic tours. 

Tours departing June 23 and July 
14 are designed for vocational edu- 
cators at the secondary and post- 
secondary levels. These tours will 
focus on current vocational and 
occupational education in London, 
Paris, Brussels and Amsterdam, 
with emphasis on staff develop- 
ment, curriculum, administration, 
training and student recruitment. 

Departing on June 16 will be a 
study tour that offers an oppor- 
tunity to observe the education and 
care of children up to seven years 
of age in schools and communities 
of Scandinavia. Included will be 
visits to day nurseries, kinder- 
gartens, child care facilities, teach- 
er training institutions and chil- 
dren's art programs. 

Additional information can be 
obtained from Stout's Office of 
Continuing Education. Phone (715) 
232-1333. 



During the 1978-79 academic year, 
approximately 5,200 Stout students 
received some type of financial 
assistance for a total of $9.8 million, 
according to a report released this 
week by the University's Financial 
Aids Office. 

"This represents about 75 per- 
cent of the student body enrolled 
during 1978-79 or $1,395 per stu- 
dent," the report said. "These 
figures include only assistance that 
has been processed through or sent 
to the Financial Aids Office by out- 
side agencies." The report goes on 
to say that many other students 
received benefits such as the GI 
Bill, veterans benefits, social 
security, vocational rehabilitation, 



graduate assistantships and teach- 
ing assistantships. "There are also 
students who have received schol- 
arships from their hometown or 
other agencies which are given 
directly to the student," the report 
adds. 

Of the $9.8 million total, $5.3 
million comes from federal pro- 
grams, $1.5 million from state 
programs and $2.8 million from 
miscellaneous sources. 

Largest items include the Gua- 
ranteed Student Loan program, 
$2.7 million; Minnesota-Wisconsin 
Reciprocity, $2.7 million; and the 
Basic Educational Opportunity 
Grant Program, about $1 million. 



A grant to discuss mental health 
services in rural Wisconsin has 
been awarded to Stout by the 
National Institute of Mental 
Health. The $14,000 award is de- 
signed to bring together profes- 
sionals and consumers to share 
concerns and hopes about mental 
health services. 

Lee Morical, director of the 
NIMH-funded Peer Counselor 
Project, is in charge of the new 
project, known as "Rural Mental 
Health Dialogues." 

According to Morical, Stout is 
one of the few institutions in the 
country which has been given sup- 
plementary funding for "special 
initiative projects" in rural mental 
health because of ongoing projects 
in that field. The University's Peer 
Counselor Project is a national 
model to train rural housewives for 
paid employment as paraprofes- 
sional counselors. 

Morical said three invitational 
conferences, or "dialogues," will be 
held in Wisconsin in early 1980. 
"Each will provide a chance for 
rural mental health consumers to 
meet in an informal setting with 
psychologists, psychiatrists, social 
workers and other mental health 
providers to discuss mental health 
needs, barriers to meeting those 
needs and responsibilities and ex- 
pectations of both consumers and 
providers," Morical said. 



An Eau Claire architectural firm, 
Larson, Hestekin, Smith, Ayres, 



11 

Ltd., has been awarded a bid to 
draw preliminary plans for re- 
modeling Bowman Hall on the 
Stout campus. 

Known as the "tower building," 
Bowman Hall was erected circa 
1896 and is the oldest existing 
structure at Stout. Total cost of the 
remodeling project will be $1.9 
million. Work is expected to begin 
in fall with completion in late fall 
of 1981. 

Included in the project will be 
an elevator and an additional stair- 
way. Remodeling will make the 
building accessible to people in 
wheelchairs. It will also make 
usable the building's fourth floor, 
which has been closed for years 
because of building code regula- 
tions. 

Other work will include recon- 
figuration of some rooms and up- 
dating plumbing, electrical and 
heating systems. 



An animated 30 second public 
service announcement titled "Clyde 
the Kid," has brought two awards 
to the Stout Teleproduction Center. 
The spot was a recipient of a 1979 
Gabriel Award for excellence in 
local public service announce- 
ments; and a 1979 Graphics and 
Design Competition Award pre- 
sented by the Graphics and Design 
Council of the National Association 
of Educational Broadcasters. 

The prestigious Gabriel Award 
is presented annually by Unda- 
USA, an association of media com- 
municators. It recognizes outstand- 
ing programs and spots that ex- 
emplify the broadcast art and con- 
tribute to a deeper understanding 
of human values. 

"Clyde the Kid" was created in 
1978 as part of a parent-teacher 
relationship campaign for the Wis- 
consin Education Association coun- 
cil. The spot encourages parents 
to take an active part in their 
child's education under the theme 
"Parents are Teachers, Too!" 

Designer and animator was 
Lonna Freelove, television design 
specialist at the Teleproduction 
Center. The spot was written by 
Max Herbach and the soundtrack 
was created by Larry Roeming, 
both of the Center staff. 



12 



People You Know 

Three alumni from the Class of 
1909 are now being identified 
as the earliest living graduates of 
Stout. They are Clyde; Bowman 
in Massachusetts, Theodora 
Coffin in California and H. P. 
Gerbcr in South Dakota. Write 
tin- .Miiiiini Olfi'ii- I! win Know 
ol an\ earlier lu.uluales who 
are still living. 

e i? * 

Gerald Sehneek -US '70. MS "72: 
lias been named eliairperson of 
the 1980 Homecoming Alumni 
Reunion Banquet on Oct. 11. 
Former ,■ staff workers of the 
Stoutonia and Tower, plus mem- 
bers of the Classes of 1945, 1955, 
1965 and 1970 will be honored 
by alumni and faculty at tin: 1 
Saturday evening affair. 

Denver area alumni are invhV 
eel to a get-together with Jim 
Daines (BS '57, MS '60) in the 
Beverly Boom of the Denver 
Hilton on Tuesdav, April 22. 
5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Jim will be 
attending a national convention 
of the Association for Educa- 
tional Communications and 
Technology. 



Rutli Thomas (BS '-(5) has been 
named chairperson of the Dis- 
tinguished Alumni Awards Com- 
mittee for 1980. Although selec- 
tions for 1980 will have been 
made by the time this edition is 
published, Mrs.; Thomas invites 
additional nominations for the 
Alumni Distinguished Service 
Award for future years. Include 
biographical data and state why 
nominee is distinguished in your 
letter.: ■ - > " 



All alumni in Jamaica were 
called together bv Margaret 
Bennett (BS 78) to form a 

:JamMca" Chapter ■: of itheEStoui; ' 
Alumni Association. The in- 
augural, meeting was held in 
Linstead and was chaired by 
Rudi Brown (BS '65). Bennett, 
Brown, Tyrone Grant and 
Gladstone Carty have been 
named to a working committee. 

■■Mailing address for the new 
chapter is Box 750, Spanishtown, 
St. Catherine. 



Delegates to the American 
Home Economics Association 
national conference in Dallas, 
Texas, in June, are invited to 
attend an alumni get-together 
hosted by Dean Tony Samenfink. _■ 



Time and place will be in pro- 
gram. , ' 

David P. Barnard (BS '46, MS 
'47), dean of learning resources, 
Isipohference.; chairman ;f or. the : 

-T5t&A^ual; Edu^afiphal: Media ■ 
and;Teohhblogy;:,Conference -to 
be 'hosted;: iby^tout^July; 14-16. : 

■ ; : -; -Eeaders ;; ifrom- ^business : -and ; 

-education in height: rsfafes; will: 
give l presentations ^''iHeadlihefs' 
will:»be j-pail i> Cg Joseph^-: staff ■ 
scientist-futurist : at Sperry 
Univac in St. Paul. Minn., and 
Mick Rhodes, executive "produc- 
er, NOVA WGBH-TV, Boston. 
Seven concurrent workshops will 

4 ■cpver^; : subjects-^frpiil t-fjeleconfer- 

/ ehcihgtp-icp^pu^ 
Other presentations will relate 
to /the vise ^pf ^rhicrpprqeessors, = 

;. accountability; taiid> overcoming '■< 
sfaf f = humdrums ^fe-:v^ :z~- '.^Z : l r ~i':r:. 

Again this year, there will be 
exhibits y:7afid:^fjiS:iitl:radrtibnalv 
"Piggus Roastum." Write Dave 
Barnard for more information. 
--^C'*; ! ' ■"■; : "-':i*;-'£S '■'«#. W^K;,''. ■;■"■■ 

Torn Phillips, director of die 
dietefics;:£i:pgfarn, : ;has 'issued art: 
early: inyitatibh''tp^ . ; 

the Al3anta^area;;-f pgatfehd \ an ■' 
alumni: iget-tbgethei - ; ^during - the . 
ADA Convention, Oct. 6-10. 




UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN • STOUT • MEN0M0NIE, WISCONSIN 54751 



If the person to whom this 
is addressed is located else- 
where, please write correct 
address on this side and 
return to post office. 

Return Postage Guaranteed 
Address Correction Requested 



SPRING 



Non-Profit Org. 

U.S. Postage Paid 

Menomonie, Wis. 

Permit No. 3 



1980